KentChemistry HOME

 
 

 
Custom Search

Addition Substitution Fermentation Esterfication Saponification Combustion polymerization Fractional Distillation Cracking

 

Cracking

 

What is cracking?

Cracking is the name given to breaking up large hydrocarbon molecules into smaller and more useful bits. This is achieved by using high pressures and temperatures without a catalyst, or lower temperatures and pressures in the presence of a catalyst.

The source of the large hydrocarbon molecules is often the naphtha fraction or the gas oil fraction from the fractional distillation of crude oil (petroleum). These fractions are obtained from the distillation process as liquids, but are re-vaporized before cracking.

There isn't any single unique reaction happening in the cracker. The hydrocarbon molecules are broken up in a fairly random way to produce mixtures of smaller hydrocarbons, some of which have carbon-carbon double bonds. One possible reaction involving the hydrocarbon C15H32 might be:

Or, showing more clearly what happens to the various atoms and bonds:

 

This is only one way in which this particular molecule might break up. The ethene and propene are important materials for making plastics or producing other organic chemicals. The octane is one of the molecules found in petrol (gasoline).


Cracking
Cracking takes large hydrocarbons and breaks them into smaller ones.


Cracking breaks large chains into smaller chains.

Addition Substitution Fermentation Esterfication Saponification Combustion polymerization Fractional Distillation Cracking

Chemical Demonstration Videos